Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 24 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays

BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!

With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome Birmingham as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about the City.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is Birmingham!

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BirminghamWeAre - a FreeTimePays Community of Passion and digital portal for people who want to make a difference!




With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays is delighted to welcome Birmingham as a Community of Passion. Together with our People with Passion, this digital space will be used to showcase all that's great about the City.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and promote the passion that is Birmingham!


BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

BirminghamWeAre delivers a digital space for people who are passionate about Birmingham and want to do whatever they can to help their community.

At BirminghamWeAre, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

BirminghamWeAre

BirminghamWeAre will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for their community.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts.

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for Birmingham.

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50 passion points

Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 23 Aug 2019 - FreeTimePays

Are you passionate about promoting your passion and your City? Join Us!

BirminghamWeAre is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact for Birmingham.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Birmingham and connect with people who share their passion.

View more

Are you passionate about promoting your passion and your City? Join Us!




BirminghamWeAre is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that utilises digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact for Birmingham.

‘People with Passion’ are given the digital space and the digital tools so they can promote their passion for Birmingham and connect with people who share their passion.


BirminghamWeAre is all about engaging people in the passion that is Birmingham.  To help promote your passion, your City and, of course yourself, connect HERE

BirminghamWeAre is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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40 passion points

Featuring

People & community
Displaying until 31 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Connect with FreeTimePays for social impact, economic growth and community engagement

Take up a partnership with FreeTimePays, advertise, build brand image or even launch your own community of passion using FreeTimePays digital technology.

 

 

View more

Connect with FreeTimePays for social impact, economic growth and community engagement




Take up a partnership with FreeTimePays, advertise, build brand image or even launch your own community of passion using FreeTimePays digital technology.

 

 


There are many ways you can use and deploy FreeTimePays technology to engage your community and support your objectives. 

 

Take a look at the packages we offer and Connect with us for a solution that is tailored to meet your precise requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call us on 0121 410 5520 or Connect with us to discuss our partnerships.

 

For more about the FreeTimePays engagement suite and the many applications for engaging, inspiring and rewarding people for collectively making a difference, see more details here.

 

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80 passion points

News & Updates

Sport & leisure
5 hours ago - FreeTimePays

Wow! Artists impression of new £60m aquatics centre for Commonwealth Games in 2022

Artists impression showing how the new £60 million Sandwell aquatics centre will look have been unveiled. The state of the art facility with Olympic-sized swimming pool, 25-metre diving pool and capacity for 1,000 spectators will be built in Smethwick on Londonderry Lane. At the end of the Games, it will become a leisure centre. 

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Wow! Artists impression of new £60m aquatics centre for Commonwealth Games in 2022




Artists impression showing how the new £60 million Sandwell aquatics centre will look have been unveiled. The state of the art facility with Olympic-sized swimming pool, 25-metre diving pool and capacity for 1,000 spectators will be built in Smethwick on Londonderry Lane. At the end of the Games, it will become a leisure centre. 


Members of the public now have a couple of weeks to comment on the plans for the swimming pool.

Sandwell Council has commented as follows: “We want your views on the design and facility mix. This will support the formal planning application which will be submitted after the consultation period has ended.”

In respect of sustainability, MP Dame Caroline Spelman, who was Environment Secretary during the 2012 Olympics, has said: "I had a responsibility as Environment Secretary for the sustainability of the Olympic Games in 2012, and one of the important questions you have to be able to answer when it comes to the sustainability of a sporting event is will those facilities be sustainable in the future,

Sustainability is a three-pronged concept. It’s economic, environmental and social. So I can see it’s always going to be difficult where you’ve got to break some new ground, but one of the new facilities would come to Sandwell, and it would be a lasting benefit for the community.

But in terms of sustainability, if you look at what is happening, the augmentation of seating capacity is mostly designed because we’ve learnt from the London Olympics that you can build temporary seating to bump up the capacity of your facility, that you can then take back down so that you’re not left with a white elephant.

And you won’t get a white elephant. You will get a great legacy in Sandwell."

Councillor Ian Ward has said that arrangements will need to be made between Sandwell Council and Sport England over the use of green belt land but still feels that 2022 will be the ‘Greenest Games’ to date and he adds "I think for Sandwell to have what I believe will be the best aquatics centre in the country, post games, is going to be a fantastic boost for Sandwell."

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40 passion points

Inspiration

Photography
6 hours ago - Jay Mason-Burns

"A trip around my patch, Selly Oak" - a photo post from Jay's blog

One of Birmingham's People with Passion, Jay, shares with us his passion for his hometown suburb of Selly Oak in Birmingham where he has lived all his life. 

Take the full post for a great article and some wonderful photography.

Why not share your passion for where you live by selecting Connect with Us.

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"A trip around my patch, Selly Oak" - a photo post from Jay's blog




One of Birmingham's People with Passion, Jay, shares with us his passion for his hometown suburb of Selly Oak in Birmingham where he has lived all his life. 

Take the full post for a great article and some wonderful photography.

Why not share your passion for where you live by selecting Connect with Us.


Howdy. Welcome to my latest blog post during which I'd like to invite you on a whirlwind trip in pictures around my hometown suburb Selly Oak, in leafy South Birmingham. 

The Steeple of St Mary's CoE Church, built 1862 in the Gothic revival style.  This is the Parish church of Selly Oak, Birmingham.

Harborne Walkway, off Reservoir Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

Selly Oak is one of those places that people often pass through on their way into and out of the City without stopping to look around to get a feel for the place. I love the place, and I hope that by reading this I can demonstrate to you why.   

The 63 bus going towards Birmingham, down the High Street, Selly Oak, Birmingham

I was born at Selly Oak Hospital in 1968, I grew up in the area which, back in the late '60s / early '70s, had a large Irish population (indeed my family are Irish).  I still live and work in the area, it's amazes me how much it's changed, especially during the last 20 years as old industries and populations have given way in the face of the University's expansion and urban regeneration. 

Where I was born, the remains of Selly Oak Hospital, closed 2013, Raddlebarn Rd, Selly Oak, Birmingham

I invite you to look a little closer to see that there's beauty in them there hills, there's a bustling population and a rich fascinating history ready to be explored.  Selly Oak is on the up, despite the naysayers and years of planning mismanagement! 

Selly Oak High Street

"Edgbaston Pool" at Winterbourne House & Garden, Selly Oak, Birmingham. 

Selly Oak is three miles from Birmingham's City Centre.  It's bordered by the more famous neighbours Harborne, Bournville and Edgbaston.  The Birmingham to Worcester Canal cuts a gentle swathe through the area, with the Cross City railway running parallel alongside.  The River Bourn flows gently throughout Selly Oak's parks and beneath the bustling traffic of the A38 Bristol Road. 

Autumn on the Birmingham to Worcester Canal, Selly Oak, Birmingham

The 'High Street' of Selly Oak, stretches for close to a mile, winding up what was once called 'Selly Hill' near the University Campus at Bournbrook Road through to the top of Weoley Hill where the new University of Birmingham School sits on the corner of Weoley Park Road. 

Autumn jogging, Weoley Park Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

The High Street is a real mish-mash of old and new, shops, pubs, offices, ancient churches, meeting houses and halls.  There's even a pocket park behind the Aldi Store dedicated to street art and graffiti. 

Street art, Bournbrook Graffiti Park, Selly Oak, Birmingham

The Big Wall at Bournbrook Graffiti Park, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Mr Yummy, Selly Oak High Street, Birmingham

Selly Oak's history is rich and varied, having been traced back to Roman times, it was even mentioned in the Doomsday Book of 1085, as 'Escelie or Eschelli'.  Theories abound about how Selly Oak received its name, ranging from corruptions of 'Salt ley' or 'Saltway' referencing the Salt trade that travelled Icknield Street from Droitwich (via the old Roman fort at Metchley) to the North Sea; to 'Sele leah' which meant a woodland clearing with a hall on it or arable land.  The fort's remains are preserved in-situ next to the University's Medical School on Vincent Drive :-)

Japanese Garden, Winterbourne, University of Birmingham, Selly Oak, Birmingham

A more scrullious story refers to Sarah's (or Sally's) Oak, named after a local witch who was apparently hanged and buried with an oak stake driven through her heart, which it was claimed then grew into a mighty oak tree.  In 1909 the ancient oak tree that had become known as the 'Selly Oak' was cut down, despite great public outcry, to enable the widening of Oak Tree Lane.  Today, the stump of this tree remains preserved (but half forgotten) beneath bushes in Selly Oak Park. 

Cyclists on Gibbins Road, by Selly Oak Park, Selly Oak, Birmingham (University clocktower in the distance)

In the late 18th / early 19th century Selly Oak was described in Francis Leonard's 'Story of Selly Oak' as "a small hamlet, part of the Parish of Northfield... when it consisted of about 50 houses, a Chapel and several outlying farms....where the High Street and Market Places were still country roads flanked with meadows and cornfields".  Back in those days "heavy traffic on the main road was represented by 20 stage coaches daily", there was no railway or tramway system, and the few inhabitants who visited 
the neighbouring town of Birmingham had to walk or pay for a ride to town on the old horse bus from the Gun Barrels Tavern, near Edgbaston Park Road. 

Looking up the High Street, by Dawlish Rd, Selly Oak, Birmingham

However things were about to change rapidly. The arrival of the Worcester and Dudley no. 2 canals brought with them a massive influx of industry and people.  The Industrial Revolution was in full swing, huge lime kilns lined the canals at 'Selly Port' where Quicklime was produced in vast quantities and distributed via barge to be used in construction.  Gravel and red clay was plentiful from pits and quarries in Selly Oak, supplying the local brickworks at Harborne and California (near Bartley Green). 

Selly Oak Cranes on the site of the Battery Park redevelopment, by B'ham to Worcester Canal, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

Prominent industrialists such as John Nettlefold, Thomas Gibbins and George Muntz established large premises in the area making bricks, volatile chemicals, screws, ammunition and metal 'hollow ware'.  These industrialists were also keen philanthropists, investing in their communities by donating land for public parks or investing in local schools and community buildings. Nettlefold built his family a beautiful house and garden at Winterbourne (later donated by the subsequent owners to the University) and oversaw the design and build of the community focused garden suburb of Moor Pool just up the road in Harborne. 

Winterbourne House, University of Birmingham, Birmingham

 Sunrise Silhouette, Muntz Park, Selly Oak, Birmingham

By the late 19th century, as Selly Oak's population expanded rapidly, housing was built on a vast scale for the workers in the local factories and a workhouse was established by Oak Tree Lane, this later became Selly Oak Hospital.  This expansion precipitated the need for clean drinking water, so a borehole three hundred feet deep was dug to extract water for public consumption.  A huge gothic style pumphouse (grade 1 listed) was built over the well to house a Boulton and Watt steam engine that pumped the water out for domestic use. 

The Pumphouse, Selly Oak, Birmingham

It was opened in 1879, to great acclaim, by Joseph Chamberlain (who later founded the University).  However with the subsequent opening of the Elan aqueduct, the Well became redundant and was capped and the Pumphouse deemed surplus to requirements.  It was later converted into an electricity sub-station, whilst the steam engine and pump were dismantled (now on display at Birmingham's Thinktank museum).  Despite the change of use I'm sure you'll agree it remains an impressive building. 

Pumping Station House, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Industry persisted long into the late 20th century with names like BSA motorcycles, Westley Richards Gunmakers and the Boxfoldia works, but those factories have long since made way for retail parks, student Halls of Residence, a road bypass and a new aqueduct and railway viaduct to straddle the bypass. 

The Ariel Viaduct with the University of Birmingham in the background, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Much of lower Selly Oak by the University has changed beyond recognition as industries, land and entire embankments have been cleared and re-landscaped.  

The Ariel Aqueduct crossing the Selly Oak bypass  (Aqueduct named after BSA Ariel motorcycles that were built in a factory on this site) Selly Oak, Birmingham

Between the Aqueduct and Viaduct, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Rich Bitch Studios, where bands like Black Sabbath, ELO, Slade, Roy Wood and Robert Plant have recorded music, was based in a converted engineering factory behind the High Street shops.  It was home for aspiring Brummie bands and musicians for over thirty years and hosted international greats such as Earth, Wind and Fire, Ruby Turner and US rockers Skid Row.  Sadly however they sold up and moved out in 2014 after which the studios were demolished to make way for new halls of residence for students, called the Recording Rooms.

Down the High Street, looking towards Edgbaston. Rich Bitch Studios was behind the shops on the left. 

Despite the prevailing change in it's encumbent population, Selly Oak retains a lot of it's old character.  Victorian housing dominate it's tight side streets, and in some places, beautiful buildings do remain. 

Lottie Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Selly Oak is very much a place in transition, it's changing all the time and it's my dearest hope that we can keep our oldest buildings. Many of Selly Oak's important buildings have been lost over the years, public houses have disappeared throughout the area following a wider national trend.  Thankfully, one of Selly Oak's finest buildings, The Goose at the Old Varsity Tavern, still remains.   

Cat's Eye View, The Goose at the O.V.T., Selly Oak, Birmingham.

This place has quite a wonderful history.  It was recorded in 1700 as a travellers inn; in 1839 the owner was James Kerby and it was called the Bell and Shovel Inn.  Kerby owned 43 acres of land, known locally as 'Kerby's Pools', it was a Victorian pleasure resort right in Selly Oak!  Its three pools were devoted to boating and fishing and there was also a leisure garden.  People came from all over Birmingham to enjoy the entertainment and facilities the resort offered.  Kerby staged a variety of seasonal attractions and events like fireworks displays. It was one of few spots for fishing within walking distance of Birmingham.

Later on there's a brilliant story about the first Australian test cricket team to visit England!  Mr Kerby and his partner Mr North further developed the site with a running track that enclosed a cricket pitch, adjacent to the Bournbrook Bridge.  A famous local team, the Pickwicks, defeated the Australians in a memorable game here.  It's recorded that "Mr Talboys", the Pickwick resident professional bowler, took five wickets for 37 runs, whilst the rest of the Australians were dismissed cheaply by a local cricketer, the late Mr. W. Boylin!  What a day that must have been!

Victorian Terraces on George Road, looking toward the Unversity, Selly Oak, Birmingham (these sit on the land once occupied by 'Kerby's Pools'. 

Arguably the 'Jewel in the Crown' at the heart of modern Selly Oak, is the campus of the University of Birmingham (which technically straddles the border with neighbouring Edgbaston).  Around the University Campus we have a surfeit of wonderful architecture, including the world's tallest free standing clocktower (at over 300 feet tall), the Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clocktower, affectionally known as 'Old Joe'.  

'Old Joe' Clocktower, University of Birmingham, Selly Oak, Birmingham

The University of Birmingham received its royal charter in 1900, uniting Queen's College, Birmingham (founded in 1825 as the Birmingham School of Medicine and Surgery) and Mason Science College (established in 1875 by Sir Josiah Mason).  The founding of our University made it the first English 'red brick' university to receive its own royal charter.  The Campus, like the rest of Selly Oak, is a hive of construction and redevelopment as the University looks to it's future.. From the beautiful red brick heart of the Campus you can see the art deco styled Medical School and Hospital on Vincent Drive. 

University Medical School and QE Hospital Clocktower, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

In the heart of the Campus new buildings are springing up all the time; cutting edge laboratories, research facilities, aswell the sharp and sleek modern Library, designed by Associated Architects. 

University of Birmingham Library, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

More or less opposite to these new interlopers sits the brutalist masterpiece that is Muirhead Tower.  Home of the invaluable Cadbury Research Library and storage facility, Muirhead Tower sprang up in 1969 during a previous bout of University expansion.  It's my favourite building on campus :-)

In the heart of Selly Oak new buildings are springing up to host the huge influx of students from across the Globe.  The latest, and perhaps most impressive of these facilities, is the Unite Halls of Residence designed by Glenn Howells Architects. It sits on the site of the old Birmingham Battery Works beside the canal that once supplied the old factory with fuel, labour and materials.  When I was growing up there was a tiny "Greasy Spoon" type cafe beside the old works.  It was perched on a timber and concrete plinth that overhanged the canal on the edge of this bridge.  I used to wonder how it didn't fall into the canal, it looked so precarious, then one day it closed and demolished tout suite, and all those stories and history were gone! 

Selly Oak Canal Bridge and the Unite Halls of Residence, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Behind the Halls a huge retail park has recently opened after years of extensive land cleaning and reclamation.  It hosts an array of shops, eateries and will eventually be home to the University's new Life Sciences Park.  It caused a bit of an uproar when the demolitions were started to clear the sites.  The Battery offices that fronted onto the High Street had been modestly beautiful buildings, but sadly like many places, money talks and that past was swept aside. 

The Unite Halls of Residence atop the former site of the Birmingham Battery (empty land in foreground is proposed Life Sciences Park) Selly Oak, Birmingham

Battery Park, the new Selly Oak Shopping Centre

When the Sun goes down Selly Oak comes alive with the sound of bustling student night life.  The High Street is filled with chic little student-centric shops, Asian and Oriental eateries, pubs, a Shisha bar and even a Mr Egg Cafe!   

Mr Egg! High Street, Selly Oak, Birmingham

Night Life in Selly Oak, crossing the High Street, by Selly Oak Station, Selly Oak, Birmingham

It's hoped that, as part of the area's continuing regeneration, two of Selly Oak's most treasured buildings will be renovated - the Library and the Selly Oak Institute.  Both sit close to all the amenities on the High Street and yet they're sadly empty.  The Institute was built and opened in 1894 by the Cadbury family for the 'education and betterment of local people'.  It's a curious building, an odd melange of building styles, and yet it remained true to it's original purpose as a popular adult education facility until the early 2000s. 

Selly Oak Institute, High Street, Selly Oak, Birmingham

On the opposite side of the High Street, nestled in the shadow of the railway bridge, sits the empty yet very beautiful, grade 2 listed 'Carnegie' library.  Andrew Carnegie, the Scottish-American Steel magnate and philanthropist, donated £3000 for the building of Selly Oak's library on land donated by Thomas Gibbins, the owner of the Birmingham Battery.  The library was opened in 1906 by Gibbins himself and remained in use until 2015.  I love this place, I spent many hours here in my youth, it developed my love of reading and of local history.  I hope that a fitting purpose is found to keep it for all our futures. 

Selly Oak Library, beside Selly Oak Station, Birmingham

Perhaps Selly Oak's most beloved and famous building is no longer IN Selly Oak itself!  The Manor House of Selly Oak, or simply, Selly Manor, was originally located at the top of the hill on Bournbrook Road, near to the present day Catholic church of St Edward.  A beautiful timber, lime plaster and herringbone brick building, it dates back to the early 14th century as home to the Tithe lords of Selly Oak, the Jouette family.  Records show that luminaries such as Lord Catesby (of the Gunpowder Plot notoriety) and Oliver Cromwell himself lodged at the Manor during their country travels.  In 1907 George Cadbury bought the house and had it re-erected and restored on a beautiful garden site in Cadbury's new village at Bournville.  Today Selly Manor is a wonderful museum dedicated to the history and heritage of medieval Birmingham, if you have a chance do visit it. 

Selly Manor, originally located Bournbrook Road, Selly Oak, now Willow Road, Bournville, Birmingham

So that brings us to the end of our little tour of my Selly Oak.  I hope my text and photos have brought the area to life for you, and demonstrate why I love the area so.  As a street photographer I find a lot of inspiration just wandering the High Street and observing people going about their daily lives.  It's my place, my history, my family's heritage and I'm proud of it.  Thanks for reading!

Jay Mason-Burns a.k.a. jayjayjjetplane

 

Waiting for the last bus, Selly Oak, Birmingham

 

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40 passion points

News & Updates

Environment & green action
13 hours ago - FreeTimePays

Air Quality across the City - Birmingham's on a mission!

Councillor Waseem Zaffar, Cabinet Member for Transport & Environment at the Birmingham City Council talks of the "brave and bold leadership Birmingham has shown by introducing Clean Air Zone class D".

In this post, Laura Creaven, an award winning blogger in Birmingham, reviews the Q&A event held in Birmingham during December 2018. 

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Air Quality across the City - Birmingham's on a mission!




Councillor Waseem Zaffar, Cabinet Member for Transport & Environment at the Birmingham City Council talks of the "brave and bold leadership Birmingham has shown by introducing Clean Air Zone class D".

In this post, Laura Creaven, an award winning blogger in Birmingham, reviews the Q&A event held in Birmingham during December 2018. 


Climate change, traffic congestion and poor air quality have all been hot topics in the media, particularly in Birmingham where the Council’s announcement of a Clean Air Zone has brought some heated opinions from residents.  London Sustainability Exchange (LSx), who have been working with residents in some of East Birmingham’s wards, arranged a question and answer session for Birmingham residents to pose questions to academics, councillors and campaigners.

Opening the evening, Alice Vodden from London Sustainability Exchange gave some background to how the evening came about; working with residents of Birmingham’s Sparkbrook and Ward End, particularly looking at poor air quality around high servies areas, they realised that a co-ordinated collection action would create more change.  Realising that the residents they worked with grasped the problems, but also had a lot of questions, LSx convened a group of panellists who each have an interest in air quality in Birmingham.  Each speaker was given a few minutes to talk about the subject, with the rest of the time offered up to questions from the floor.

The first person to talk was Dr Zongbo Shi, Senior Lecturer in Atmospheric Biogeochemistry at the University of Birmingham.  Dr Shi talked about what exactly is air pollution and why a blue sky is not necessarily a clean sky, despite what people might think.  By studying the data it was clear to see that whilst Birmingham might not have the dangerously high levels of particle matter in the air that cities like Dehli have, air quality pollutants are fairly consistent in causing problems even at lower levels, so Birmingham needs to act – particularly at roadsides where it is a bigger problems than in urban backgrounds.

Dr Shi pointed out that a few percent of GDP is lost to air pollution, giving examples of people who become sick and then cannot work because of respiratory illness.  He and his team are working on WM Air, the West Midlands Air Quality Improvement Programme, which supports improvements to air quality in the area and the knock on benefits to health and education.

Next up was Councillor Waseem Zaffar, Cabinet Member for Transport & Environment at the Birmingham City Council who talked about the brave and bold leadership Birmingham showed by introducing Clean Air Zone class D, which means all vehicles (Buses, coaches, taxis, PHVs, HGVs LGVs and cars) but motorbikes are included within the remit.  This is the toughest of the Clean Air Zones on offer but Councillor Zaffar pointed out that even this wasn’t enough, and that the council weren’t interested in merely being legally compliant, but that this would be the jumping off point, as good air quality is important to future generations and to reduce health inequalities within the city, especially as the Clean Air Zone encompasses some of the poorer communities with the city.  He was also careful to point out that the council are aware these communities will be impacted by the creation of the Clean Air Zone and that they have requested additional funds from central government to support these groups, and small businesses within the zone.

Sue Huyton from the British Lung Foundation was the third panelist and she spoke about the unsafe levels of air pollution around hospitals and GP surgeries, both nationally, but also in Birmingham, where three hospitals are in areas that are unsafe and 41% of GP surgeries in areas which exceed the safe levels for air pollution, higher than the national average.  Sue praised  the national leadership shown by Birmingham City Council class D, but would want to see WHO recommendations for better air quality included in the Environment Bill, believing the answer to clean air lies in legislating for it.

Stirchley resident Sandra Green joined the Clean Air Parents’ Network because she wanted to engage with how air pollution affected children.  Through the network she’s met with a number of interesting people, but talked about a sobering meeting with someone from UNICEF who she always thought of as working on child issues around the country, but found out that they have a campaign around UK children’s right to clean air.  Sandra believed that the way to change attitudes is through hearts and minds, and that things like the reusable cup example show it is possible, especially if we get people to think of air quality in the same way.

The final speaker of the evening was Chris Crean from Friends of the Earth West Midlands.  Chris expressed thanks to the organisers for arranging the evening, Birmingham City Council for persevering, even when faced with criticism from within their own party, but that the biggest thanks should go to Client Earth who have successfully taken the UK government to court three times over air pollution in the country.  Recognising reports which talked about having only 12 years to act on climate change, Chris talked about the need to change how we live so that we have a sustainable economy, but also that we leave a tolerable planet for future generations to live on, and that this can’t simply be things like cleaner and green cars but less cars on the road.  He also spoke about the concerns government is only interested in compliance, rather than challenging further and whether they will put their money where their mouth is by supporting local councils to make the necessary changes.

Whilst Chris praised the leadership of the council for implementing the Clean Air Zone, he did also point out a number of inconsistencies including plans to widen the Dudley Rd to more traffic and the chaos over changes to buses in south Birmingham, and what this says to residents and businesses within the Clean Air Zone.  Councillor Zaffar agreed this was a fair point and that the council needs to reprioritise the road space, make a walkable city centre and connect the new cycle-ways to existing paths.  Chris ended his talk suggesting that the city is not an island and that it needs to work with others in the conurbation, by sharing ideas like Solihull School Streets campaign [a pilot project which aims to address such issues by limiting traffic in the streets surrounding schools at key times, creating a predominantly car free zone] and working together to make a real impact.

And with the talks done it was over to questions.  As usual, several questions weren’t actually questions but more comments, offering to install pilot air filters which have been successful in India, calls to extend the Skips Clean Air Cops from primary into secondary schools, and whether contact information for people in the room could be shared.

Questions about investment were asked, with Councillor Zaffar replying that a London-centric government does not fund transport fairly, and that the area has a long way to go in terms of charging points for electric vehicles and pushing for public transport not to move to the compliant Euro VI emissions but rely on hydrogen and electric vehicle fleets instead.  Questions around the joined up thinking around cycling were also raised, with Councillor Zaffar explaining how Manchester and the West Midlands authorities had spent transport money (WMCA spent it on the metro), and how Birmingham still needed to invest more but hopes that different ways of working, like the partnership with the Canals and River Trust, would be of use.

Gavin Passmore from sustainable transport charity Sustrans asked about how receptive schools had been to the ideas around reducing parents driving to school and it was a mixed response, with Sandra Green saying teachers are keen and are thinking of innovative ways to implement it into the curriculum through things like maths and physical educations, whereas Sue Huyton pointed out that some schools are initially hostile due to concerns about how it would negatively impact the school, but that going in on a reducing carbon footprint was a more positive spin on a similar topic.

Public transport was something that came up in both the panelist and audience questions, with one audience member posing the question as to whether Birmingham could take inspiration from numerous other cities around the world and introduce free public transport.  Councillor Zaffar said this was a great aspiration, and that there is certainly a need to make public transport cheaper, but that whilst the West Midlands Combined Authority Major has the right to franchise public transport, this isn’t something he seems to be looking at.  But that Birmingham City Council are trying to make changes where they can by introducing bus lanes and gates which prioritise buses on the roads.

The last question of the evening was around the response to the consultation for the Clean Air Zone, which has been controversial within Birmingham.  The audience member pointed out that two thirds of responses were negative, and how do we change this and get people to see what the issues are.  Sue pointed at the work Client Earth had done around their Poisoned Playground campaign, as well as the British Lung Foundation’s website, which used data to show the impact on areas.  She recognised the limits of the data, but said that this data has given vocal parents the ammunition to accelerate things and put pressure on bringing about change.  And finally Councillor Zaffar called for a bottom up approach which saw young people as vital to encourage parents to enact change.

Links

Laura Creaven is an award winning bogger in Birmingham. To view more of Laura's posts visit her blog HERE.

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Architecture
11 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown

Calthorpe Estates Edgbaston white Regency / Victorian villas / town houses Part 2

A second selection of the white Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town house in Calthorpe Estates Edgbaston. Mostly the posh looking area between the Hagley Road and Calthorpe Road. There is so many fine examples now. Mostly they are now offices. There are also examples on St James Road and George Road, which are towards the Islington Row Middleway and Wheeleys Road.

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Calthorpe Estates Edgbaston white Regency / Victorian villas / town houses Part 2




A second selection of the white Georgian / Regency / Victorian villas / town house in Calthorpe Estates Edgbaston. Mostly the posh looking area between the Hagley Road and Calthorpe Road. There is so many fine examples now. Mostly they are now offices. There are also examples on St James Road and George Road, which are towards the Islington Row Middleway and Wheeleys Road.


For my first post follow this link Calthorpe Estates Edgbaston Part 1.

Hagley Road

The Calthorpe Estates offices is located at 76 Hagley Road. On the corner with Highfield Road. The building dates to the early 19th century and is a Grade II listed building. White stucco with a slate roof. The Calthorpe Estates manages over 1600 acres of land across Edgbaston in Birmingham. Seen around November 2015 when they had Christmas reindeer on the Highfield Road side. You would normally find them around Edgbaston during the Christmas season each year.

One of the earliest buildings of the Calthorpe Estates. Regency House was built from 1819 until 1820 and was designed by Thomas and Joseph Bateman for John Harris. Only the regency façade is Grade II listed, as the building behind was demolished and rebuilt in 1971 by John Madin Design Group (JMDG) for Rentcroft Investments (and that is of no special historic interest). A terrace of six former houses, now offices. No 97 to 107 Hagley Road. It is built of brick covered in whitewashed stuco with a slate roof.

Praza an Indian Restaurant with Cocktail Bar & Dining at 94 and 96 Hagley Road. Grade II listed building. The building dates to the early 19th century and was built as a pair of semi detached houses. Stucco with a slate roof.

Cadbury Brothers

For my post on the Cadbury Brothers follow this link Cadbury Brothers: George and Richard Cadbury.

17 Wheeleys Road was the former home of Richard Cadbury who lived here from 1861 until 1871. Blue plaque from English Heritage. The houses at 17 and 18 Wheeleys Road were built in 1829 and have first floor Ionic pilasters.

At 32 George Road near the corner of St James Road was the former home of George Cadbury. Who lived here from 1872 until 1881 according to the blue plaque from English Heritage. The house is a Grade II listed building and was built in 1820 as a detached 2 storey stucco villa. The house has fluted Tuscan columns to the doorcases.

St James Road and George Road

The Roundhouse at 16 and 17 St James Road. A Grade II listed building. It's a good example of a stucco cottage combining picturesque Italian rustic manner with gothic-Tudor details. Was originally built as a freestanding folly in 1810 in the grounds of 29 George Road. Wings added to garden front and wings to roadside added in 1830. Further additions of a service wing around 1860-70.

Over on George Road is St James Place. It's a Grade II listed building, now offices. Originally built as the Original House and Service Coach House Wings at the Skin Hospital. Was built between 1830 and 1840 as a substantial Grecian villa of 2 storeys with 5 bays and is stucco faced.

Back to St James Road with what is now Busy Bees Nursery. The building isn't listed but looks of the 19th century period of the other Calthorpe Estates buildings in the area. Is close to Calthorpe Road and the HSBC building is behind it.

Hallfield School

This is Hallfield School and it has a couple of white stucco buildings that you might see on the no 1 bus route. The school was founded in 1879, and they will be 140 years old in 2019! The white stucco school buildings are located near Church Road.

First up, this building used as a Day Nursery. Grade II listed building dating to about 1850. Listed as the Main Block to Hallfield School. It has a rusticated porch with round-arched entrance framed by coupled pilasters.

This is the main building of Hallfield School, if you are on a train on the Cross City line, or heading up or down the Worcester & Birmingham Canal, you might be able to see the back of the school buildings from the playing field. While these buildings are not listed, it dates to about 1860 and was originally a large villa called Beech Lawn.

The view of Beech Lawn, now the main building of Hallfield School from the towpath of the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. Next to the canal is what is now known as the Cross City line. The Edgbaston Tunnel is a short distance away and it goes under Church Road. Normally from the train, you can normally just see the playing fields, as these Victorian brick railways walls get in the way of the view! You can't tell from here that the building is now part of a school!

Calthorpe Road

This is 20 Calthorpe Road, close to St James Road. Currently it is To Let but formerly it was occupied by DG Mutual. A Grade II listed building. It is an early Calthorpe Estates villa dating to about 1820 to 1830. Grecian stucco symmetrical 3 bay elevation on 2 storeys. There is a former coach house on the left.

Next up is Al Rayan Bank at 24 to 25 Calthorpe Road. A Grade II listed building. Built as a pair of semi-detached Calthorpe Estate stucco villas in the year 1840. There is a Roman Doric doorway at no 25.

The next building down is a Grade II listed building at 26 Calthorpe Road. Rubric Lois King Solicitors. A stucco villa built in 1840. A detached version of the villas at Nos 24 and 25. Doric column porch.

The RoSPA are at 27 and 28 Calthorpe Road, also a Grade II listed building.  These buildings date to about 1830 and is a pair of 3-storey semi-detached stucco Calthorpe Estate villas. No 27 was altered in 1850, but also has a former coach house absorbed into a modern wing. No 28 was unaltered with an original entrance porch of unfluted Tuscan columns.

Photos by Elliott Brown

 

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Environment & green action
11 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Together We Can and Together We Will! Birmingham's target is to reduce emissions by 60%

Birmingham City Council has ambitious plans to meet a 60% emission reduction target by 2027. With everyone involved and with everyone playing their part, this target and more can be achieved - Together we can and Together we will!

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Together We Can and Together We Will! Birmingham's target is to reduce emissions by 60%




Birmingham City Council has ambitious plans to meet a 60% emission reduction target by 2027. With everyone involved and with everyone playing their part, this target and more can be achieved - Together we can and Together we will!


The following extract is taken from the Birmingham Energy Prospectus website viewable HERE.

"... Birmingham is on a journey. The City's journey is to lower carbon emission, decrease fuel poverty and increase global competitiveness as set out within the Birmingham Carbon Roadmap and the Regional Energy Strategy for the West Midlands...

The Birmingham Energy Prospectus will assist the Council to consider its capital investment plan for economic growth and the policy approach to support decarbonisation and fuel poverty ...

Birmingham City Council has engaged Perform Green to assist the City in identifying potential planned and envisaged low carbon energy and transport projects/initiativesacross the City and to assemble this in an Energy Prospectus ..... This will enable the Council to have productive dialogue with investors, companies, communities and householders."

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Introducing

Environment & green action
10 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Do you want to help protect the environment? You can!

GreenActionWithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that helps people who want to make a difference, deliver real change and contribute towards positive social impact.

We give people who want to make a difference the digital space and the digital tools so they can engage with others, promote what they are doing and use the space to take their passion to the next level.

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Do you want to help protect the environment? You can!




GreenActionWithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that helps people who want to make a difference, deliver real change and contribute towards positive social impact.

We give people who want to make a difference the digital space and the digital tools so they can engage with others, promote what they are doing and use the space to take their passion to the next level.


GreenActionWithYou is all about engaging people in the promotion and of a healthy and clean environment and the recognition that our environment and the space around us is there for us all to enjoy and look after.

GreenActionWithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
09 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018

Some nice festive tones in the lighting conditions for this update with the tower just shy of topping out. See more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of Bank Tower Two - December 2018




Some nice festive tones in the lighting conditions for this update with the tower just shy of topping out. See more photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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History & heritage
08 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown

Victorian and Edwardian shopping Arcades still in Birmingham City Centre

While Great Western Arcade is the most well known Victorian shopping Arcade in Birmingham City Centre, others do survive, although not as well known. The Burlington Arcade and Piccadilly Arcade both go from Stephenson Street to New Street. The City Arcade goes from Union Street towards Union Passage. Great Western Arcade goes from Temple Row to Colmore Row.

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Victorian and Edwardian shopping Arcades still in Birmingham City Centre




While Great Western Arcade is the most well known Victorian shopping Arcade in Birmingham City Centre, others do survive, although not as well known. The Burlington Arcade and Piccadilly Arcade both go from Stephenson Street to New Street. The City Arcade goes from Union Street towards Union Passage. Great Western Arcade goes from Temple Row to Colmore Row.


Piccadilly Arcade

Built as a cinema in 1910, it was called the Picture House and showed silent films. The architects was Nichol & Nichol of Birmingham. The cinema closed in 1926 and was converted into an arcade of shops. It's original name was the West End Arcade due to it's links to the West End Cinema.

The bronze fascia and shop fronts dates to 1926 and was by J R Shaw. A previous refurbishment in 1989 was done by Douglas Hickman of the John Madin Design Group with trompe l'ceil ceiling paintings by Paul Maxfield.

The entrance to the Piccadilly Arcade on Stephenson Street seen in February 2010. Even from this view you can tell that it looked like a cinema. That year, it had been 100 years since the building had first been built!

The most recent refurbishment of the Piccadilly Arcade was completed during November 2018. They had repainted the lower half of the building in a black paint. Perhaps to make it look a bit more traditional. The overhead wires are from the West Midlands Metro line, which at present doesn't go beyond Grand Central Tram Stop, as they are building the next extension to Centenary Square. And they closed off this end of Stephenson Street to add the new tracks to the existing tracks.

The interior of the Piccadilly Arcade during October 2010. It slants up from the Stephenson Street entrance towards New Street. When you walk up the arcade, you can't help but look up at the amazing artwork on the ceiling. As of 2018 it is 29 years old (1989). The BT phone box with the old style BT logo dates it to the late 1980s.

This view from December 2018 with Christmas decorations after the most recent refurbishment. Previously the shop fronts had been painted white, now they are painted black. Although the ceiling around the paintings is still painted white.

This interior view of the Piccadilly Arcade was taken in October 2010. Heading down from New Street towards Stephenson Street. You can head this way down to Birmingham New Street Station. At the time it was around then when the redevelopment of the station had begun, and would take 5 long years to complete!

Summer 2017 in the Piccadilly Arcade, and they had one of the Big Sleugh bears inside, this one was called Wild City by the artist Kathleen Smith. I think it was half way near the top close to New Street.

View of the Piccadilly Arcade from New Street. This view was taken in August 2010. From here you can see Wren style turrets on the top of the building. Details you wouldn't notice if you walk past.

If you get a window seat at Pret a Manger on New Street, like I did in January 2018, you get this view of the Piccadilly Arcade. From there I noticed details when zooming in from my camera. There is a shield on top. Just above the Piccadilly sign is what looks like a pair of babies sitting on a duck! Most people would just walk past and not even look up at the details of any of the buildings on New Street.

 

Burlington Arcade

Originally built as the Midland Hotel between 1867 and 1875 for Isaac Horton and designed by Thomson Plevins. Later became the Burlington Hotel from the then owners Macdonalds Hotels & Resorts. The hotel entrance turned into Burlington Passage (or the Burlington Arcade) around 1994.

Starting from Stephenson Street. This view was from January 2011 before the road was dug up to lay the Midland Metro extension tracks. May have also been when traffic stopped going on Stephenson Street. Although I seem to recall that buses last used the road in 2012 (when routes were changed when the bus interchanges were built).

I have cropped this photo of a Midland Metro Urbos 3 tram at Grand Central Tram Stop to show the Burlington Hotel. This was in May 2016 when tram drivers were training and doing tests on the 1st extension before the line opened to the public. The new Birmingham New Street Station fully opened in 2015, although the Stephenson Street section was completed in time for Half Time Switch Over during 2013 (when half of the new station opened and the other half closed to create the new concourse). Entrance to the Burlington Arcade is on the left, slightly after the tram stop.

I don't often take photos when I pass through the Burlington Arcade, but this caught my eye on the left (as I walked from the Stephenson Street entrance towards New Street). Steps down to an underground bar called the Bacchus Bar. The wall paintings and columns reminds me of either Ancient Greek art or Ancient Roman art. Maybe even like something you would find at the ruins of Pompeii!

The only photos of the interior of this arcade I have were with Christmas lights during late December 2009, looking up towards the ceiling. You can see all the red brick work from Victorian times. Plus a modern glass ceiling from the mid 1990s. This was coming from the New Street entrance heading down towards Stephenson Street.

Christmas lights on this side looking down towards the Stephenson Street entrance (also December 2009).

As far as I recall, I haven't taken a full on shot of the Burlington Hotel from New Street, mostly indirect shots like this one. Christmas lights seen at night on New Street during November 2010. The entrance to the Burlington Arcade from New Street is to the right between the shops. On the New Street side it is two blocks either side of the entrance to the Burlington Arcade. Italianate in white brick, now painted.

A new view of the Burlington Arcade entrance on New Street, as seen from Cannon Street during December 2018, while the Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market was on.

The modern entrance canopy between the two blocks. Also the entrance to the Burlington Hotel.

Great Western Arcade

The Great Western Arcade was originally built around 1876 to 1877 by the Great Western Company above the Snow Hill railway tunnel between Moor Street and Snow Hill stations. The architect was W H Ward, who was influenced by Joseph Paxton's Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in 1851. The arcade is a Grade II listed building.

The arcade suffered heavy bomb damage during World War 2 and the Colmore Row entrance had to be rebuilt. The arcade was restored in 1984.

The Temple Row entrance retains it's historic Victorian facade, and looks amazing after it was restored. If you headed up the North Western Arcade from Corporation Street, you might enter the Great Western Arcade if you are walking towards Birmingham Snow Hill Station.

Stop for a minute on Temple Row and look up above the entrance. There is a sculpture called Allegories of Science and Art, also by the architect W H Ward, who made it in 1875. The male figure on the left represents science, holds attributes including dividers and compasses. The female figure on the right represents the arts, holds an painter's palette and has an easel by her side. It used to be visible from the first floor of Coffee Republic opposite, although they closed down early in 2017. The arcade is in the Italian-French Renaissance architecture style.

One of my first views of the interior of the Great Western Arcade seen during September 2009, this view from Temple Row towards Colmore Row, looking up at the ceiling. Probably a replacement, as the original was bombed out during WW2. Many shops lines both sides of the arcade.

It was June 2012, and Union Jack bunting lined the Great Western Arcade. This direction from the Colmore Row entrance towards Temple Row. Again looking up at the ceiling. This was during the Queens's Diamond Jubilee in 2012.

Christmas decorations in the Great Western Arcade. These went up during November 2018. Again Colmore Row towards Temple Row.

During February 2013, the Big Egg Hunt was on in Birmingham City Centre. Was many easter eggs up and down the Great Western Arcade. Close to the Temple Row exit was this easter egg with a bunny rabbit on it!

The Big Hoot 2015 was a trail of owls around Birmingham during the summer of 2015. Long after the trail ended, they made one more owl for Christmas 2015. Seen during December 2015 was Christmas Owl designed by Jane Anderson. These owls were nice to see around Birmingham.

The Colmore Row entrance of the Great Western Arcade. It matches the design of the office block on the left called Colmore Gate which was built between 1990 and 1992 by the Seymour Harris Partnership. Built in the style of Cass-Gilbert-period New York. Offices above the arcade, shops below. You would see this entrance if you are leaving Birmingham Snow Hill Station the Colmore Row entrance. The last major refurbishment to the arcade was in 2009.

City Arcade

This arcade was built from 1898 until 1901, by T.W.F Newton and Cheattle, the decorative terracotta and green faience by Doulton and Co and other detailing by W J Neatby. The arcade is a Grade II* listed building.

We start off looking at the entrance from Union Passage, you might come up here from New Street (past the Britannia Hotel). Or from up Warwick Passage that leads from Corporation Street. Most of these photos were taken during November 2009.

Another view of the Union Passage entrance looking at the upper floors. Most of the time this arcade isn't too busy, and it is usually just a shortcut from Union Street to Union Passage. Since the former Big Top centre closed for refurbishment (near where WH Smith used to be) this area has gotten even quieter. The listing for this building describes the Union Passage side as "ulilitarian".

Don't often take new photos of City Arcade these days when I pass through or around here. This was November 2015 shortly after a cafe called Tilt opened. You can see Corporation Street over to the left down Warwick Passage.

A look up at the ceiling in City Arcade. You would only be in here for a short period as this arcade isn't that long. It is a coffered ceiling. You would notice the green and red details in the ceiling as well as the intermittent cupolas. There is red window frames at both ends.

There is nothing much else to say about the interior ceiling of City Arcade, although there used to be a net below the ceiling. But it looks like that was removed sometime between 2016 and 2017. The light fittings inside are certainly unique, a bit like chandeliers!

The Union Street side of City Arcade. There is three storeys on this side of the building. At the top is polygonal turrets with little cupolas. Santander is in the City Arcade units on the left on the corner with Union Passage. Back in 2009 it was still Abbey. Christmas lights seen on Union Street during November 2009.

WH Smith was in the building next door, although they moved out of those units earlier in 2018, to some of the former BHS units on Union Street a bit further down. City Centre House is an office block to the left. This road is between High Street (to the left) and Corporation Street (over to the right). Martineau Place is opposite of City Arcade on Union Street.

Looking up to the turrets and domes on the Union Street façade of City Arcade. Most people just pass by without noticing the details. Such as the portrait faces, can you see them?

You can tell the difference between a building from the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, to the building next to it built a century later. Doesn't have as much details, although they did try there best! Superdrug occupies the ground floor of the building at the corner of Union Street and Corporation Street. It is called Victoria House. It does have some domes at the top of it's own corner turrets.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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Civic pride
06 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown

Sir Barry Jackson founder of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre

The Old REP on Station Street and the New REP in Centenary Square. The Birmingham Repertory Theatre was founded in 1913 by Sir Barry Jackson. The REP was known to do modern versions of classic plays such as Shakespeare. He later went to the RSC in the 1940s in Stratford-upon-Avon.

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Sir Barry Jackson founder of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre




The Old REP on Station Street and the New REP in Centenary Square. The Birmingham Repertory Theatre was founded in 1913 by Sir Barry Jackson. The REP was known to do modern versions of classic plays such as Shakespeare. He later went to the RSC in the 1940s in Stratford-upon-Avon.


Sir Barry Jackson

He was born in 1879 in Kings Norton, living until 1961. He founded the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in 1913. Before founding the REP, he formed a company with his friends called The Pilgrim Players in 1907. This was the foundation of the future Birmingham Repertory Theatre Company. In the early years of the 20th century, they performed plays to family and friends. By 1912, Barry Jackson began to develop plans to build a permanent theatre building on Station Street. Barry was knighted in 1925.

Below is a bronze bust of Sir Barry Jackson seen at the REP in Centenary Square during September 2013 (after the new Library of Birmingham had opened). At the time, the REP was celebrating their 100th anniversary.

Also seen in the modern REP building in 2013 was this portrait of Sir Barry Jackson made up of many other smaller photos. A bit like a mosaic.

Seen in the Shakesepare Memorial Room at the Library of Birmingham was this Gavel. It was presented to Sir Barry Jackson in 1936. As a pioneer of modern Shakespeare at The REP during the 1920s. By the 1940s he later became Director of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. The Library of Birmingham opened in 2013 next door the the new REP which originally opened in 1971 (10 years after Sir Barry Jackson passed away).

Before we get onto the old and new REP's in Birmingham, first a look at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. The building opened in 1932, on the site adjacent to the original Shakespeare Memorial Theatre (opened in 1879), which had been destroyed by a fire in 1926. It took the name of Royal Shakespeare Theatre in 1961, following the founding of the Royal Shakespeare Company the year before (1960).

Sir Barry Jackson was Director of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre from 1945 until 1948 (when he retired).

This view below was from 2009 during the redevelopment of the theatre.

This view from 2013 after the redevelopment had finished. The theatre reopened in 2010, and was officially opened by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh in 2011. Seen here with the River Avon.

This River Avon view of the RST was from 2014.

Back to Birmingham and first we go to Station Street with what is now known as The Old REP.

It was the first ever purpose built repertory theatre in the UK, it opened in February 1913. The main entrance is on Station Street, opposite Birmingham New Street Station. There is a blue plaque here for Sir Barry Jackson. The architect was S. N. Cooke.

In this view with the hotel Comfort Inn and The Electric Cinema. There is various Chinese restaurants down there on Station Street as well. The view is from was what used to be Queen's Drive at New Street Station. Station Bar also known as Platform 13 is to the left (I think the bar is getting a refit when I last walked past it).

The front view of The Old Rep Theatre on Station Street. When The REP moved to a new building in 1971 near Broad Street (now in Centenary Square), Birmingham City Council took over the building. During renovations of their Centenary Square building, The New REP temporarily moved back into the Old REP from 2011 until 2013. From 2014, Birmingham Ormiston Academy, (also known as BOA), too over the use of the old theatre building.

The view round the back of The Old REP on Hinckley Street. This is the Stage Door entrance. There is a taxi rank on this side.

A close up look at the rear entrances of the Old REP on Hinckley Street.

Now a look at The New REP first built in 1971. The Birmingham Repertory Theatre Company moved to the site near Broad Street in a building by Graham Winteringham and Keith Williams Architects. This was around 10 years after Sir Barry Jackson had died. The area would not become Centenary Square for another 20 years (1991). This view from 2010, before the Library of Birmingham has been built and before the theatre renovations had started. Sir Barry Jackson had supported the building of a modern theatre but he died before it became a reality.

This view from 2009. There used to be steps outside, but that was removed during the 2011 to 2013 renovation works of the theatre. There is another Birmingham Civic Society blue plaque on this building to Sir Barry Jackson. For some years it was missing but it was returned here in 2013 when the theatre renovations were complete. The other blue plaque is for J. Sampson Gamgee, surgeon and founder of the Birmingham Hospital Saturday Fund, who lived in a house on this site. J. R. R. Tolkien later used his name for the character of Samwise Gamgee in the Lord of the Rings trilogy!

Nightshot view from 2017. By then the theatre had been open again from 2013 after the new Library of Birmingham had opened. Marmalade Bistro had opened by then. This was slightly before the square had been hoarded off for the redevelopment of Centenary Square (there is still hoardings in front of the theatre).

Close up view in late 2017. Due to the renovations works of the square, this is currently the pedestrian walking route past the theatre, so the bar can't have it's tables and chairs outside at the moment.

Rear views of The REP on Cambridge Street near the roundabout close to City Centre Gardens. This view from 2010 from before the theatre was closed for a few years during the renovations while the Library of Birmingham was also being built next door.

The rear of the theatre seen in 2013. The Library of Birmingham is now complete and would open in September 2013. A complete different look to it's brutal predessor of 1971 to about 2011. There is regularly flower displays on that island on Cambridge Street.

 

Photos by Elliott Brown

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Did you know?

Civic pride
05 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown

John Baskerville: creator of his own typeface

Baskerville House is in Centenary Square on the site of the former home of John Baskerville. He lived and worked here between 1748 and 1775. There used to be an artwork made in 1990 called Industry and Genius (that has now gone into storage due to the Centenary Square redevelopment). It spelt out Virgil (but the characters in reverse).

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John Baskerville: creator of his own typeface




Baskerville House is in Centenary Square on the site of the former home of John Baskerville. He lived and worked here between 1748 and 1775. There used to be an artwork made in 1990 called Industry and Genius (that has now gone into storage due to the Centenary Square redevelopment). It spelt out Virgil (but the characters in reverse).


John Baskerville

Born in 1706 or 1707, he lived until 1775. Baskerville was best known for being a printer and type designer. He was born in the village of Wolverley, near Kidderminster in Worcestershire. He lived in a house on Easy Row, which is now where Baskerville House is in Centenary Square. His home was also known as Easy Hill.

Below is an exhibit seen at the Birmingham History Galleries at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. The top item shows a plaque that reads:

"Grave stones.
Cut in any of the hands.

John Baskerville"

At the bottom is what looks like a snuff box with a portrait of John Baskerville.

A map of the location of John Baskerville's home at Easy Row. He was buried he vertically, but his body later had to be moved to Christ Church in 1821, as a canal basin was built on the land. Christ Church was demolished in 1897 and his remains was moved again to a crypt at the Catacombs Warstone Lane Cemetery.

I would assume that somewhere around here at Warstone Lane Cemetery, at the catacombs lies the remains of John Baskerville. He only wanted to be buried on his own land, but the constant redevelopment of Birmingham in the 19th century resulted in him being moved twice! John Baskerville was not a fan of consecrated grounds!

The model of the Proposed Civic Centre was seen at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery in 2015. It is normally to be found at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre, so if you go to BM & AG today, you wont see it there now.

Below are the details about the model.

William Haywood, Baker Studios, Erdington (made by)
Model of Proposed Civic Centre (Scale 1" to 12ft),
1941

This model was designed by William Haywood, a special lecturer in town planning at Birmingham University. He supervised its construction by Baker Studios in Erdington over a 12 month period completed in 1941.
The model represents a variety of public buildings including a Planetarium, Natural History Museum, and City Hall, as well as extensive gardens and car parks.

The Hall of Memory and Baskerville House can be seen at the front and middle of the model.

In August 2009 opposite Baskerville House, archaeologists were digging up the car park where from 2013 onwards would stand the Library of Birmingham. It was the remains of the Baskerville Basin. Gibson's Arm was a private canal that was built during the 1810s. John Baskerville's house was burnt down during the Priestley Riots of 1791. Baskerville Basin was filled in during 1938 to make way for the Civic Centre. Thomas Gibson was the one who acquired the land and property in 1812.

Baskerville House seen during April 2009.

It was originally completed in 1938. Before WW2 started, there was plans for the area that is now Centenary Square, for a Civic Centre. But Baskerville House and the Hall of Memory were the only buildings to be completed as part of that scheme. It is built on the site of John Baskerville's home of Easy Hill. Which itself was replaced by a canal basin, known as Baskerville Basin. Was also another basin there called Gibson's Basin. They would have both existed there from the 1820s until about 1919 (or later as the Birmingham City Council had purchased the land for their Civic Centre scheme). T. Cecil Howitt of Nottingham was asked to design Baskerville House in 1936.

The war halted construction of Baskerville House, and after WW2 ended, Roman Imperial imagery on public buildings went out of fashion. The building is now Grade II listed, and was renovated from 2003 until 2007. Used to be offices for the City Council, until they moved out in 1998.

In 2010, the statue of King Edward VII was restored after spending many years in Highgate Park. You can see it to the right of Baskerville House (it is currently behind the hoardings of the Centenary Square renovation works). This view from November 2010 shortly after the statue was installed at this spot. In fact it is the only statue to remain in the square while Centenary Square is getting done up (which wont be finished until sometime in 2019). The original Centenary Square was completed in 1991.

In 2013 the Library of Birmingham opened on the site of what was a car park between The REP and Baskerville House. Seen below in December 2017 after it was announced that Birmingham had won the bid for the 2022 Commonwealth Games. The refurbishment of Centenary Square started in 2017 and should have been completed by the end of 2018, but a series of delays means it will probably not be completed until sometime in 2019. You wouldn't know from the way it is now that canal basins used to be here. Although archeologists examined the land under the Library of Birmingham in the summer of 2009 before the library was built.

There used to be a typeface sculpture outside of Baskerville House called Industry and Genius. It was made in 1990 by local artist David Patten. It is a Portland stone sculpture of the Baskerville typeface.

I took invidual photos of each letters and flipped them. Together it reads "Virgil". The standing stones represents the letter punches which Baskerville cut to make his type, and the world virgil was Baskerville's first book, published in 1757, as a re-print of the Roman author's poems. The sculpture went into storage a few years ago when the redevelopment of Centenary Square was about to start.

Photos by Elliott Brown

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Introducing

People & community
04 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Introducing Jonathan Jaffa - a great Champion of Community in Kings Heath

https://www.youtube.com/embed//eTSt24jWbuE

An initiative to honour people within the community who go that extra mile to help out has been launched in Kings Heath -  We feature Jonathan Jaffa, a life long resident and proprietor of the oldest business (York Supplies established in 1947) in Kings Heath.

Take the YouTube link above for the interview with Jon who does some great work in the community.

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Activity for you

People & community
04 Dec 2018 - FreeTimePays

Nominate your Community Champion in Kings Heath

Survey logo

Kings Heath is a neighbourhood full of great people and great organisations that go that extra mile to help out in the Community. Whether it's a person, a team or an organisation, take the link and make your community nomination and in a few words tell us why you feel they are worthy of such an honour.

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
03 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley

The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018

A bit of a grey day for this December construction update, mainly photos from the Library of Birmingham's 'Secret Garden' over looking the site and some new perspectives.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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The Construction of One Chamberlain Square - December 2018




A bit of a grey day for this December construction update, mainly photos from the Library of Birmingham's 'Secret Garden' over looking the site and some new perspectives.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Gallery

Construction & regeneration
02 Dec 2018 - Daniel Sturley

Construction at Arena Central - December 2018

Construction at Arena Central continues with the main structure for Three Centenary Square (HMRC Midlands) going up quickly now. Dandara is essentially complete. Many photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley

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Construction at Arena Central - December 2018




Construction at Arena Central continues with the main structure for Three Centenary Square (HMRC Midlands) going up quickly now. Dandara is essentially complete. Many photos in the full post.

Photo by Daniel Sturley


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Gallery

Transport
02 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown

The Shakespeare Express and The Polar Express

Most summers along the Shakespeare line, Vintage Trains used to run steam trains between Birmingham Snow Hill and Stratford-upon-Avon. They now also have a licence to run trains on the mainline from the Tyseley Locomotive Works to Birmingham Moor Street during the Christmas season. It is quite the sight to see a steam train going over the Bordesley Viaduct! Look out for it in Digbeth.

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The Shakespeare Express and The Polar Express




Most summers along the Shakespeare line, Vintage Trains used to run steam trains between Birmingham Snow Hill and Stratford-upon-Avon. They now also have a licence to run trains on the mainline from the Tyseley Locomotive Works to Birmingham Moor Street during the Christmas season. It is quite the sight to see a steam train going over the Bordesley Viaduct! Look out for it in Digbeth.


In September 2015, the Shakespeare Express was at Birmingham Snow Hill Station at platform 1. When I got to platform 3, saw the steam locomotive 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe decouple and head towards the Jewellery Quarter tunnels, before it returned and recoupled at the other end. Didn't have the best views from platform 3 to be honest!

The steam locomotive is seen puffing away towards the tunnels that leads to Jewellery Quarter Station.

The carriages at platform 1. They filled the length of the platform.

I didn't have the best view from platform 3. One of the carriages as passengers walk past!

Earlier that day I saw The Shakespeare Express passing through Hall Green Station. The front of the engine was attached to the carriages. So the back end was heading towards Stratford-upon-Avon. They would probably have to decouple it again at Stratford-upon-Avon, so the engine would be facing the front towards Birmingham Snow Hill!

The name plate of the special service is seen at the front.

Most of the stations on the Shakespeare line opened in 1908 and are of the Edwardian period.

 

The Polar Express run by Vintage Trains started in the last week of November 2018 and will run throughout the Christmas season until late December 2018. Should be every Thursday to Sunday.

Steam puffing away into platform 4 at Birmingham Moor Street Station.

There was photographers on both platforms. And probably on all the days that it is due in at Moor Street Station. As well as from the Moor Street Car Park view. The Poppy Appeal train from Chiltern Railways was at platform 3.

Rood Ashton Hall or as it is known during this Christmas season as the Polar Star slowly comes into the platform.

There is a view from the ramps down from the Bullring to Moor Street Queensway.

Into the concourse then down the steps to Moor Street. Before that a few views as the Polar Star comes to a stop.

Seen with Chiltern Railways 68012 at platform 3. Platform 5 is the only platform yet to be restored at the station.

I have also seen the Polar Express from a train I was on the next day passing through Bordesley Station. Was a bit awkward getting photos from the train as it passed. Later saw some views of the Polar Express returning to Tyseley over the Bordesley Viaduct through Digbeth. Quite a sight to see!

At the back was as diesel locomotive D1755 47 773.

I also noticed from my train that they have done up the Tyseley Locomotive Works around the Tyseley Warwick Road platform area for Christmas.

The Polar Express seen from the Bordesley Viaduct in Digbeth. The train was stationary on the viaduct, probably waiting for it's slot to go into Birmingham Moor Street Station. These views of 4965 Rood Ashton Hall / Polar Star from Oxford Street in Digbeth.

Was a bit difficult to see it from this side, heading from Bordesley Street. So walked under the viaduct for a look on the other side of Oxford Street.

On this side of Oxford Street, Rood Ashton Hall seen with a pub that the Peaky Blinder Pub was due to take over (used to be an Irish pub called O'Rourkes).

Had to walk further down Oxford Street and close to the Digbeth High Street.

These views of the back of the train. D1755 / 47 773 seen from Milk Street in Digbeth.

When you are up there, you don't realise how far down from the viaduct it is! The area is close to the Custard Factory, and various pieces of graffiti / street art.

Photos by Elliott Brown

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63 passion points

Inspiration

Transport
30 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Special liveries on Chiltern Railways and Virgin Trains seen in Birmingham

This is not a heritage trains post, more showing photos of the special liveries Chiltern Railways and Virgin Trains did to some of their trains around the Christmas period and at other times of the year. Chiltern Railways seen at Birmingham Moor Street Station. Virgin Trains seen at Birmingham New Street Station and at Coventry Station.

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Special liveries on Chiltern Railways and Virgin Trains seen in Birmingham




This is not a heritage trains post, more showing photos of the special liveries Chiltern Railways and Virgin Trains did to some of their trains around the Christmas period and at other times of the year. Chiltern Railways seen at Birmingham Moor Street Station. Virgin Trains seen at Birmingham New Street Station and at Coventry Station.


Chiltern Railways

Runs trains on the Chiltern Mainline between Birmingham Snow Hill and London Marylebone. There main fast trains are the Class 68's with the Mark 3 carriages and driving van trailer (numbered as 823xx). Here we will look at a pair of 823xx trains at Birmingham Moor Street Station.

The Chiltern Santa Train seen at Birmingham Moor Street during December 2017. The driving van trailer was numbered 82302. Titan 68009 was at the front (but it's livery was not changed at the time).

Seen from platform 3. It had arrived at platform 4.

Behind is Moor Street Car Park, Selfridges and the Rotunda.

Heard that there was some nice views from Moor Street Car Park. So headed up to see. This was several floors up but not high enough.

This view of the Santa Train from the top floor of the car park as a London Midland Class 172 arrived at platform 2 (West Midlands Railway would take over from London Midland a few days later).

In November 2018 driving van trailer 82303 was in the Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal temporary livery. Seen at Birmingham Moor Street.

I noticed a Chiltern train arriving at Moor Street from a bus I was on in Digbeth, so after I got off the bus outside of Selfridges, went up to the top of Moor Street Car Park for these views. Lamppost in the way. It was at platform 3.

Headed right for a clearer view of the Poppy train. Derelict buildings in the background was used as a filming location for Ready Player One! (filmed in 2016 released in 2018).

Close up look at the Poppy train. As I headed over the parametric bridge into Selfridges, the train started to leave for London.

Virgin Trains

Runs trains on the West Coast Mainline between Birmingham New Street and London Euston (and also up to Scotland). They use Class 390 Pendolino's between Birmingham and London (and to other major cities along the West Coast Mainline such as Manchester and Liverpool).

Seen in late December 2014 at Birmingham New Street Station was the Traindeer. Virgin Trains Pendolino 390 112 (also known as Virgin Star). Was made to resemble a Christmas Reindeer! This livery was temporary. The train is currently unnamed.

Seen at Coventry Station during October 2017 was Virgin Trains Pendolino 390 040 in the Virgin Radio livery. This was temporary between April 2016 and November 2017.

We're Back Virgin Radio.

Seen at Birmingham New Street Station from the Moor Street link bridge during December 2016 was Virgin Trains Pendolino 390104. Alstom Pendolino. Formerly named "Virgin Scot". The co-branding between Alstom and Virgin was since September 2010.

Another Moor Street link bridge view. This time it was Virgin Trains Pendolino 390103 (Virgin Hero). It was carrying the Royal British Legion livery commemorating the centenary of World War 1. Seen during March 2018.

One more view from the Moor Street link bridge. Virgin Trains Pendolino 390151 (Virgin Ambassador), seen with the Business is Great livery during September 2017. Also known as the Virgin Trains Poppylino!

The reflection of Business is Great in the shiny panels at New Street Station.

 

Photos by Elliott Brown

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65 passion points

Gallery

Environment & green action
30 Nov 2018 - Christine Wright

A Sunday morning snapshot of Kings Heath.

I'd just bought a new lens for my camera, and was dying to try it out before the autumn colours faded! Sunday 18th November dawned bright and sunny, giving the perfect opportunity for a photo-walk around Kings Heath.

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A Sunday morning snapshot of Kings Heath.




I'd just bought a new lens for my camera, and was dying to try it out before the autumn colours faded! Sunday 18th November dawned bright and sunny, giving the perfect opportunity for a photo-walk around Kings Heath.


Many of the trees had already dropped their leaves, but the magnificent oak trees are always the last to put on a golden display. Wheelers Lane looked particularly splendid.

'Welcome to Kings Heath' says the sign. The cropped view through the 85mm lens was just right for capturing the line up of two of Kings Heath's vertical features: Sainsbury's multistorey car park and the elegant tower of All Saints Church.

Kings Heath High Street - shops and traffic.

Sunday morning, and many worshippers were at the services in 'All Saints' Victorian Anglican church and 'St Dunstan's'  1960s Roman Catholic Church 

Look up to see the interesting features of the Kings Heath shops and pubs.

Look up to see unexpected people standing out above the crowd!

The sun picks out a row of very handsome houses, and an independent hairdresser and foam shop in Heathfield Road.

Looking across the High Street from Heathfield to York Road. The Hare and Hounds pub plays a central role in Kings Heath life and entertainment, and is a central feature of the high street.

The sun lights up the pretty entrance to the Kitchen Garden Cafe in York Road.

Walking on down Waterloo Road, the telegraph poles with their tangle of wires catch my eye.

The Stained glass studio is an attractive feature on the corner of South Road and Grange Road.

The row of Edwardian villas in Grange Road, leading up to Kings Heath Park. I've not thought about the road name before, but I guess that 'The Grange' must have been the original name for the house and grounds in what is now Kings Heath Park. 

Into the park, to be met by this sunlit blaze of autumn colour, autumn leaves on trailing branches hanging over the pond, and pretty collections of autumn leaves in the tree roots.

My new lens is particularly good for these dreamy close up shots.

It was lovely to see the number of parents in the park, helping their children to learn to ride bikes, or playing football together.

Don't forget the dog walkers too!

A final look across the park to the big Park House, before I set off home along Howard Road.

Back to Howard Road East, and more glorious oak trees.

The last stretch home, walking along the path that was a field boundary long before 'the King's Heath' was engulfed by the city.

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55 passion points

Gallery

Environment & green action
29 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Raining at Kings Heath Park in late November 2018

It's late November 2018 and we have a few days of wind and rain, probably due to Storm Diana. On a day when the rain wasn't too bad, I popped along for a walk around the wet Kings Heath Park. This time headed down to the bottom, then out via the Avenue Road exit. Started off from Vicarage Road.

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Raining at Kings Heath Park in late November 2018




It's late November 2018 and we have a few days of wind and rain, probably due to Storm Diana. On a day when the rain wasn't too bad, I popped along for a walk around the wet Kings Heath Park. This time headed down to the bottom, then out via the Avenue Road exit. Started off from Vicarage Road.


On a day with dull weather a quick walk around a wet Kings Heath Park. These walks normally take me around 10 minutes (am a fast walker). Weather was bad so after I finished the walk, walked back up the Vicarage Road towards the High Street and Alcester Road South. On a dry day, I might walk down Avenue Road and into Highbury Park, or towards Selly Park.

For me Kings Heath is easy to get to. On the 11C, or the 11A back home (the park is on the Outer Circle). The no 35 bus route also passes the park, as does the 27 and 76.

The path on the left from Vicarage Road heading towards the School of Horticulture Training. King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools are on the other side of the fence to the left. Trees have mostly shed their leaves here.

Approaching Kings Heath House. Now the School of Horticulture Training. With the bad weather, wasn't anybody sitting or standing outside of the building. It's Grade II listed and dates to the early 19th century. A previous building was burnt down in 1791 during riots in Birmingham. In the late 18th century the house and grounds belonged to John Harwood. The Birmingham Horticultural Training School opened here in 1952.

Main entrance to the house. Now a ramp for those with wheelchairs or pushchairs. The tea room is over to the right. Palm trees outside remind you of the summer gone and the summer to come.

Kings Heath Park Nursery. These look like palm trees to me outside (they are probably not - am not sure on tree species).

Christmas decorations inside. Plants for sale. An open greenhouse.

Heading down to the bottom end of the park close to the Camp Hill line, past this field. Lots of trees around, mostly leave-less now.

Saw this robin on the path. Zoomed in on it. If you get to close they tend to fly away!

Some steps down to the field at the bottom of the park. Trees still in leaf must be evergreen!

The leaves on this tree have gone blood red and has left a pile of leaves below it!

Field at the bottom of the park.

Up the path from the bottom of the park as the rain came down. The branches of the trees forming a canopy, but that wouldn't stop you getting wet in the rain! Leaves on the lawn remind you that it is still autumn as winter approaches.

More trees with leaves still to be shed. Quite yellowy brown now. Heading up to the Avenue Road exit.

Saw this empty basketball court. Normally if someone was playing in here, or in one of the tennis courts, I wouldn't take a photo. Puddles all over the court. Would probably get splashed if you jumped up to throw a basketball into the hoop!

Photos taken by Elliott Brown

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73 passion points

Gallery

Photography
29 Nov 2018 - Jay Mason-Burns

Everyday People, on the streets of Birmingham

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Did you know?

Architecture
28 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

Castles within the West Midlands region

Lets take a look at some of the castles that remain in the West Midlands region. Dudley Castle (West Midlands county), Tamworth Castle (Staffordshire), Kenilworth Castle and Warwick Castle (Warwickshire). Dudley also includes a zoo. Warwick is now like a Merlin Entertainments place. Kenilworth is English Heritage ruins and gardens. Tamworth is small but intact.

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Castles within the West Midlands region




Lets take a look at some of the castles that remain in the West Midlands region. Dudley Castle (West Midlands county), Tamworth Castle (Staffordshire), Kenilworth Castle and Warwick Castle (Warwickshire). Dudley also includes a zoo. Warwick is now like a Merlin Entertainments place. Kenilworth is English Heritage ruins and gardens. Tamworth is small but intact.


Dudley Castle

Located in Dudley, West Midlands, these days it is a part of Dudley Zoo. It is on Castle Hill. A Grade I listed building.

A castle was built here soon after the Norman Conquest and was a wooden motte and bailey castle. The castle was rebuilt as a stone fortification in the 12th century, but was demolished in the orders of King Henry II. The castle was rebuilt during the 13th century. The tower we see today above the zoo was built in the 14th century. It was slighted by Parliamentarian forces during the English Civil War. There is a pair of Russian cannons that were brought back from the Crimean War. They were brought to Dudley in 1857. You can see one below from the view above the track at the zoo.

One of the stone walls and corner turrets at Dudley Castle, seen within the grounds of Dudley Zoo. This dates from the 14th century.

Dudley Castle can be seen from many places in Dudley Town Centre. This is the view from close to Dudley Sixth Form College. You can see how badly slighted the tower was on the right from here.

This view was from Priory Park in Dudley. England flag flying proudly.

This view of Dudley Castle was from Trindle Road in Dudley. The turret from the wall is seen below. From this view taken in October 2016, you can see both of the Russian cannons. Dudley currently has no railway station, but there might be a future Midland Metro line through the town. At present you can get buses there from Birmingham (bus stops are close to outside of the zoo).

Tamworth Castle

Located in Tamworth, Staffordshire. While the castle is now in Staffordshire, before boundary changes in 1889 it used to be in Warwickshire.

You might enter the castle grounds via the Holloway Lodge. A Grade II listed building, it resembles a castle gatehouse. The lodge was built in 1810. Tamworth Castle itself can be seen from above and is a Grade I listed building. A Norman castle built in 1080. The site served as the residence of the Mercian kings during the Anglo Saxon period, but fell into disuse during the Viking invasions.

Within the Castle Grounds there is a statue of Ethelfleda (also known as Æthelflæd). She was the The Lady of the Mercians in 913. The statue dates to 1000 years later in 1913 and is Grade II listed. She was the daughter of Alfred the Great. She led the defence of Mercia against the Danes, fortified Tamworth and other towns.

Tamworth Castle seen on top of the hill. Was a motte and bailey castle. Rebuilt in the 12th century, with repairs and reconstruction during the 13th century. The castle is now a museum. In March 2012 I couldn't see if it was open or not.

Heading up the path, getting closer to Tamworth Castle for a walk around the perimeter. Was nice views of the River Anker from up here. The castle was continuously in use from the 11th and 12th centuries until the 17th century. From the 16th century it was adapted as a residence, but fell into disrepair by the 18th century. The castle was sold to the Tamworth Corporation in the late 19th century (now Tamworth Borough Council).

A look round the back of the castle close up. The council has regularly maintained the castle and turned it into a tourist attraction. The grounds have been landscaped. You can get a train to Tamworth Station from Birmingham New Street, if you wish to visit this castle.

Kenilworth Castle

Located in Kenilworth, Warwickshire. It is now managed by English Heritage. It's a Grade I listed building, and was built from the Norman period to the Tudor period. The castle was the subject of a six month long Siege of Kenilworth in 1266. The castle was founded in the 1120s around a Norman great tower.

From this view you can see the Leicester's Building and The Great Tower, as you enter the castle grounds. On the August 2017 bank holiday weekend was an event called the Clash of Knights (actors were in medieval costumes).

A view of the ruined  Leicester's Building. Below was tents and canopies for that medieval bank holiday weekend event that took place at the time. Recreating what it could have been like in the 12th, 13th or 14th centuries. This tower block was built between 1571 and 1572 by Queen Elizabeth I's favourite Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. It was built to provide private lodgings for the queen and her close servants. She visited in 1572 and again in 1575.

This is The Great Tower. Kenilworth Castle was founded in the 1120s by Geoffrey de Clinton, Lord Chamberlain and treasurer to Henry I. The tower is one of the castles earliest surviving features. The Norman keep, or 'great tower' was always the most commanding building at the castle. Most of the base structure was built from 1124 until 1130. King John added an open fighting gallery around 1210 to 1215. Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester altered it in the late 16th century. He enlarged the window openings and may have used the upper floors to display paintings. During the Civil War in the 1640s, it was slighted.

There are steps up to the Strong Tower. This view was from outside of the Great Tower. You can climb up to the top. There are views of the Outer Court from the window openings of the ruined tower. Underneath there was also cellars that you can have a look at. This tower, along with the Great Hall to the left was built between 1373 and 1380 by John of Gaunt, the third son of Edward III. These parts of the castle were slighted during the Civil War in the 1640s and 1650s.

The view of the castle from the Elizabethan Garden. From here you can see the Great Tower on the left. The garden is a recreation of the The Queen's Privy Garden. There are car parks at the castle, but you can also park at car parks in Kenilworth Town Centre, and get a free bus to the castle from Johnsons (this was on the Bank Holiday visit, not sure if they do that when it's not a bank holiday). Since Spring 2018 when Kenilworth Station opened, that has given visitors from Birmingham an alternate route to get to the castle. Trains from Birmingham New Street to Coventry, then on the branch line to Leamington Spa (get off at Kenilworth). Or from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Solihull) towards Leamington Spa. Change trains towards Coventry. The castle is a 20 minute walk away from the station in Kenilworth.

Warwick Castle

Located in Warwick, Warwickshire. It is operated by Merlin Entertainments. It's a medieval castle that started after the Norman Conquest and was developed from 1068 onwards. It is next to the River Avon.

Seen from Castle Hill next to this roundabout is the Warwick Castle Lodge. It is a Grade II listed building and was built from 1796 until 1797 by Samuel Muddiman and John Williams. It has Neo-Gothic details. You can enter the castle grounds from this lodge. Tickets for the castle can be quite pricey, but it maybe possible to get an online discount.

The castle was bought by the Tussauds Group in 1978, hence why there are loads of waxwork figures around the castle. The castle started off as a motte and bailey castle. It was later rebuilt in stone during the 12th century. The facade opposite the town was refortified during the Hundred Years War in the 14th century. In 1604 it was granted to Sir Fulke Greville by James I. The Greville family, who became Earls of Warwick in 1759 held it until Tussauds bought it in 1978.

This is a view of Guy's Tower. Probably named after Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, during the 14th century.

This is a view of the Caesar's Tower. The view was from Banbury Road in Warwick. It also dates to the 14th century. The towers dominate the skyline of Warwick from the nearby houses in the area. The town centre isn't that far from the castle. It's well worth a look for it's mix of architecture.

Usually on my visits to Warwick, I'm just there to have a look around the town, so the earlier photos didn't get to see the castle from the river. In May 2016 I found a view of the castle from the Castle Bridge on Banbury Road. From here you can see people on paddle boats that look like swans or dragons. Boat hire is from St Nicholas Park. There is a weir at the far end of the river, so people in the boats have to turn back.

The castle really does look magnificent from here! Queen Elizabeth I visited the castle in 1566 and again in 1572. John Dudley was granted the castle in 1547 and was given the title Earl of Warwick. The title went extinct in 1590 on the death of Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick (an elder brother of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester who owned Kenilworth Castle). There is almshouses in Warwick called Lord Leycester Hospital. Robert Dudley founded it in 1571. You can get trains on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill or Solihull to Warwick. The castle is a short walk away from there.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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55 passion points

Inspiration

Photography
27 Nov 2018 - Daniel Sturley

"Photography and Birmingham - They've become my medicine!" - As someone who is autistic, Daniel tells us why!

Daniel Sturley, autistic and an award winning photographer, is the first of our 'People with Passion' to share his story about how his ‘special interest’ has helped him with his mental health challenges,  He also gives some great tips for producing wonderful photography. 

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"Photography and Birmingham - They've become my medicine!" - As someone who is autistic, Daniel tells us why!




Daniel Sturley, autistic and an award winning photographer, is the first of our 'People with Passion' to share his story about how his ‘special interest’ has helped him with his mental health challenges,  He also gives some great tips for producing wonderful photography. 


'Bonnie', one of our family cats in 1988

From the age of about 7 I have been fascinated by photography, and had my first camera by the age of 10, an Halina 110 film format with two built-in lenses and a flash. I would take photos while on family holidays in Wales and I particularly enjoyed capturing the rally cross meetings when visiting the local motor racing circuit. I would send off the films for processing and had to endure an almost intolerable wait of a couple of weeks for the prints to arrive. When they did arrive it was better than birthdays and Christmas!

'Old Harry Rocks' near Tunbridge Wells, part of a college photography assignment in 1989

It was not until I went to college that I did any ‘serious’ photography, including developing and printing. I did several photography projects at college and with my first portfolio I was able to get a summer job doing baby and child portraiture in Mothercare, Boots, and BHS, taking and then selling photos to parents. I received very positive feedback about my photography but I was determined to seek a career in TV and Video Production, and taking photos was purely a hobby. I sold my camera in the third year of university for beer money and almost instantly regretted it.

The view from the top of the Sears (Willis) Tower in Chicago 1997

In 1997 I went to Chicago with my father and took a small 35mm snapper. I took many photos of the huge buildings there, I was obsessed with skyscrapers and still am. I wanted to capture the feeling of standing at the base of a massive skyscraper unlike anything I had ever seen.

I had found myself in Birmingham starting my first job in the television industry in 1994 and, although I had the typical south-east view of the place and had never been before, I very quickly fell in love with the city and felt moved to use my photography as a way of dispelling all the negative myths about it. Inspired by my trip to Chicago I started to photograph what has become my adopted home city.

Victoria Square in December 2003

In 1998 at the age of 30, I was diagnosed with autism (Asperger’s syndrome) and started to understand more about my challenges and how to manage my anxiety levels better. I also understood why I had ‘special interests’, photography of architecture was definitely one of my strongest, and I adore maps and have seventy two different atlases, I love skyscrapers and satelite photography, I can't get enough of Google Earth and I can't wait till I can afford a VR kit!

In November 2005 I went to New York and Chicago for ten days working but still came back with 39 rolls of 36 exposure film!

Looking up at the 450m Willis (Sears) Tower in November 2005

It was my birthday on this trip and I was feeling rebellious so I took this one on Fifth Avenue, November 2005

I bought my first digital SLR camera in 2008 and started to accumulate a large collection of photos of Birmingham. I showed some of them to friends and family and was overwhelmed by the positive feedback and encouragement I received.

Cambrian Wharf with the Flapper Canalside Pub in 2009

In 2010 I produced a set of ten Birmingham postcards, had 200 of each printed and managed to get a few small city shops to sell them. The venture didn't succeed very well and I lost interest in photography.

I was encouraged by a good friend to develop a distinctive style and I had already identified several things that I naturally did like framing with thirds, juxterpositions, high colour, because I liked the resulting photos. But I also realised that there was the 'no people' aspect of my photography and how it reflects how I see the world.

In 2011 I found myself alone for Christmas Day and whilst I was a bit down, I wasn't lonely. As an autistic person I have a base state of alone, so I took the opportunity to indulge my 'special interest' of city photography and to wander the streets of Birmingham city centre to get some shots. Serendipity intervened to gift this set of rare photos.

CHRISTMAS DAY 2011 GALLERY

In 2013 I whad been working as a freelance video editor for a large company consistently for 18-months. The 3-hours of driving every day and extremely difficult working conditions resulted in so much stress that I became ill with clinical depression and anxiety disorder and had to cease work as a freelancer.

As part of my recovery, I was encouraged to indulge my ’special interests’ and chose to further my Birmingham promotion project by publishing my photography through social media. I published some of my archive of photos of the city but also started to take many more on a regular basis. I had fantastic feedback, I have continued ever since, publishing over 2000 photos in four years, my Twitter account now has over 1200 followers and I have sold some of my prints.

In 2015 I became a regular contributor to the new @BirminghamWeAre Twitter account and have gone on to become a full development partner with the parent social medis platform FreeTimePays.com.

My photography has been considered as a large contributory factor in the success of their community engagement project which encourages others to send in their photography of the city.

I seem to be able to see photographs waiting to be taken, I can 'frame' a scene instantly in my mind so I just need to use the camera to capture it. I love to use the 'rule of thirds' with my compositions, I like to find great juxtapositions, colours, reflections and odd 'muddles' of things that are hard to work out what's going on at first glance.

The Birmingham Pyramids, April 2016

In 2016 I visited Edinburgh with my mother and came back with many great photos of the city.

Edinburgh, a Sea of Chimney Pots - April 2016

In  May 2016 I was honoured to win ’The Cube Photographer of the Year’, after submitting one of my photos of the iconic building.

My winning submission for the Cube Photographer of the Year 2016

Later in 2016 I was also contacted by a gentleman from Price Waterhouse Cooper in Birmingham inviting me to display my photos of the construction of their new headquarters at Paradise Birmingham, One Chamberlain Square, as a timeline gallery at their current base.

My photos on the wall at PwC with Matthew Hammond, Chairman, PwC Midlands in Jun 2018

The Demolition of the Central Library, June 2016

The Construction of PwC's One Chamberlain Square during May 2018

I have continued to photograph the construction of the building and have recently been invited by PwC to collaborate on a 'coffee table' book about the building using mainly my photos.

As part of my extra-curricular work with BirminghamWeAre I have produced three 'Birmingham Gems' charity calendars.

I have a great passion for city photography and love to go on photography visits. I have created many galleries of my photos from these trips, please click below to view.

CITY PHOTOGRAPHY

Below are some examples.

Edinburgh, the Queen's Birthday Gun Salute, taken from Princes Street Gardens on a 300mm lens, April 2016  EDINBURGH GALLERY

Glasgow, September 2018, the view from the Necropolis, but what's a tomb and what's a building in the distance?  GLASGOW GALLERY

Cardiff, August 2017, one of the newly painted red dragons on the ornate obelisks outside City Hall.  CARDIFF GALLERY

Leeds, July 2017, one of the magnificent gold owls at the Civic Hall  LEEDS GALLERY

Paris, November 2011, the view Down the Champs Elysees  PARIS GALLERY

Amsterdam, August 2005, a tram jam in Leidseplein  AMSTERDAM GALLERY

Roma, April 2002, the Ruins of Il Tempio die Dioscuri ROMA GALLERY

Tivoli, April 2002, the Tivoli Gardens  TIVOLI GALLERY

New York City, November 2005, on my best ever birthday, the view north-west from the Empire State Building  NEW YORK CITY GALLERY

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Architecture
26 Nov 2018 - Elliott Brown

National Trust properties in Warwickshire

Let's head out of Birmingham and into Shakespeare's County, Warwickshire with a look at four National Trust properties that you can visit. Coughton Court, Packwood House, Baddesley Clinton and Charlecote Park. The best time to go is usually in the spring or summer, although early autumn the weather would be fine to go. But you can visit them in any season!

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National Trust properties in Warwickshire




Let's head out of Birmingham and into Shakespeare's County, Warwickshire with a look at four National Trust properties that you can visit. Coughton Court, Packwood House, Baddesley Clinton and Charlecote Park. The best time to go is usually in the spring or summer, although early autumn the weather would be fine to go. But you can visit them in any season!


Coughton Court

It's a Grade I listed building, located between Studley and Alcester in Warwickshire. It is an English Tudor country house. The Coughton estate has been owned by the Throckmorton family since 1409. The gatehouse at Coughton was built as early as 1536. The courtyard was closed on all four sides until 1651, when Parliamentary soldiers burnt the fourth (east) wing during the English Civil War.

The West Front with two wings either side of it. The North Wing is on the left, while The South Wing is to the right. The Gatehouse is made of Limestone ashlar. The wings are timber framed with lath, plaster infill and brick.

This view of the courtyard seen with the Formal Garden from the other side of the River Arrow. The entrance is via the bottom of the Gatehouse. You can only go into the South Wing of the house. The North Wing is the private residence of the current members of the family. The East Wing must have survived until a fire in 1688. It was demolished in the 1780s.

You can head up a spiral staircase while on your visit to the house and get wonderful views of the estate from the roof. It is on the top of the Gatehouse. This view towards the Formal Garden, with the North Wing on the left and the South Wing on the right. The missing East Wing (burnt in the 17th century, demolished in the 18th) would have completed the courtyard.

The Dining Room. It was the Great Chamber in Elizabethan times. The principal first-floor reception room where the Throckmortons would have entertained important guests. It appears to have become a Dining Room in the early 19th century.

The Parlour. A bit like a lounge or living room. The room was off The Saloon Passage. It couldn't be The Yellow Drawing Room  as that room is in The Gatehouse to the left of the staircase.

Packwood House

It's a Grade I listed building, located near Lapworth in Warwickshire. The National Trust has owned it since 1941. It's a timber-framed Tudor manor house. The house was built for  John Fetherston between 1556 and 1560. The  last member of the Fetherston family died in 1876. In 1904 a Birmingham industrialist Alfred Ash purchased the house. It was inherited by Graham Baron Ash in 1925. The great barn of the farm was converted into a Tudor-style hall and was connected to the main house by the addition of a Long Gallery in 1931.

The West Front of Packwood House. There is sundial on this side. There is a drive around the lawn. There used to be an uninterrupted view of the house from this side. The 'Birmingham entrance' is how the owner Graham Baron Ash used to refer to this part of his estate. So when he requested a ride in his white Rolls Royce for business his chauffeur would know which entrance to park in readiness. But there has been a hedge in the way since the National Trust took over. They are hoping to reinstate the old carriageway to it's former glory.

The South Front seen from the Raised Terrace and Carolean Garden. The house is also known as Mr Ash's House. Baron Ash donated the house to the National Trust in 1941, but continued to live here until 1947, when he moved to Wingfield Castle.

The main entrance to the house and gardens is via the gate to the left. Seen from Packwood Lane to the right is the Outbuildings. Built in the mid 17th century, they were originally barns. Baron Ash converted them to rooms as part of the house, as if they were always like that (they weren't). Inside during your visit you will go into the Long Gallery and the Great Hall. Both are lined with old tapestries and period furniture. The Great Hall is a Tudor style hall with a sprung floor for dancing.

The Entrance Hall is the first room you would enter. If you have a large bag, then you can give it to a volunteer who would put it in trunk, and they would give you a token (which you would give back when coming back to collect your bag before going back outside). There is a portrait of King Henry VIII to the right. Above is a balcony / passageway that leads to the Fetherston Room (which has photos from the early 20th century showing Baron Ash's change to the house).

The Drawing Room. There is two rooms dedicated to Queen Mary (the wife of George V) as she visited the house in 1927. A chair she sat in the Great Hall is in this room, and a cup she drank tea from is now in a glass case. There is a piano to the right of the room.

Baddesley Clinton

A Grade I listed building, it is a moated manor house, located 8 miles north-west of Warwick in Warwickshire. The house originated in the 13th century. The manor was purchased in 1438 by John Brome, who passed it to his son, Nicholas Brome. The house ended up in the Ferrers family possession from the 16th century until they sold it to the National Trust in 1980.

The view of the moated manor house from the Forecourt. There is a bridge over the moat that leads to the inner courtyard.

The moat goes all the way around the house. This view is from the Walled Garden. There is coat of arms on all the windows around the house. There used to be a bridge on this side, if you notice the stonework to the bottom of the middle chimney breast. There is a room with a view on the first floor that was built in 1460, which is to the left of where the bridge used to be. It was probably removed when the current bridge was built along with the gatehouse in 1536.

After crossing the bridge over the moat, you enter the Inner Courtyard. It has a formal garden in the middle. One side of the garden you can see the moat and the path on the other side. Entrance to the house is this way.

The Great Hall. At this end is a fireplace in the middle of the room, and a pair of doors leading to the drawing room and a small dining room. Tapestry was on the wall to the left.

The Priest's Bedroom on the first floor. A bit of a small Catholic chapel. During Elizabethan times it was illegal to be Catholic, and houses like this had a priest hole (to hide the priest). You can find the priest hole from the kitchen (steps goes below a trapdoor). It would have been used in the 1590s.

Charlecote Park

A Grade I listed building surrounded by it's own deer park, on the banks of the River Avon near Wellesbourne, about 4 miles east of Stratford-upon-Avon and 5.5 miles south of Warwick. It is a grand 16th century country house. The National Trust has administered it since 1946. The Lucy family owned the land from 1247. Charlecote Park was built in 1558 by Sir Thomas Lucy.

As you approach the house from the entrance gate, you see the Gatehouse. Don't be surprised if you see deer crossing from one section of the lawn to the other (over the path), after all this is a deer park! The Gatehouse is a Grade I listed building and was built in 1560. Brick laid to English bond with limestone ashlar dressings. There is exhibition rooms on both sides of the gatehouse, although you can't go to the upper floors. One room had a bit of Lucy family history. The other room at the time of my visit was set up like a Red Cross World War One hospital room (with a bed). People with walking difficulties, can get a golf buggy to take them around the estate.

After passing the Gatehouse, you get your first view of the house. Once known as Charlecote Hall, today it is simply known as just Charlecote Park. A magnificent view, especially on a day with a blue sky (like this one in early September 2018). The house begun construction in 1558. It was expanded in the 19th century. The extensions were built for George and Mary Elizabeth Lucy. The house entrance is straight ahead.

This view of the house from the Parterre. A formal garden with colourful flowers. It is next to the River Avon on this side, with fine views of the Deer Park. The area to the right of the house is private.

The Dining Room at Charlecote Park. A long table laid out as it could have been like in the 19th century for the Lucy family. The house is now much more Victorian than Elizabethan, as George Hammond Lucy (who inherited in 1823), recreated the house in his own style (he was High Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1831).

The Library. Table and chairs laid out for reading next to the fireplace. There is portraits around the room with Tudor and Stuart King's and Queen's as well as members of the Lucy family. Elizabeth I and Charles I are above the fireplace. Queen Elizabeth I actually once stayed at Charlecote in the room that is now the Drawing Room.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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